WE ARE NOT AN ART SCHOOL
WE ARE A KNOWLEDGE EXCHANGE RESIDENCY IN BALTIMORE
FOR ARTISTS CURATORS AND A PUBLIC THAT IS SELF-ORGANIZED
BECOME  SELF-ACCREDITED / JOIN / APPLY

 

 

 

THE REINSTITUTE

School for Innovation and Self-Accreditation in the Arts and Sciences

The Reinstitute is a critique put into practice; an idea generated from a place of personal growth and opposition to a fixed mode.  It is a school that detaches itself from traditional definitions, while at the same time aspiring to the contextualization of such means.  The school’s focus is to reorient art accreditation squarely with the artist and his relationship with the studio.  Rather than depending on a value structure that relies on a historic preserve, the school will focus on programing that is reflective of new initiatives and experimentation.  The school will examine the influence of the dominant structures of the so-called learned art practice and how these structures impede on the delicate relationship between artists and their processes.

Open Courses at THE REINSTITUTE

Classes in the form of workshops, panel discussions, lectures, and critiques will be open to the public.

“The commonwealth requires the education of people as a safe guard of order and liberty.”

SELF-ACCREDITED PHD

THE REINSTITUTE is an independent school and exhibition space in Baltimore, Maryland. We work with innovation-oriented individuals to self-accredit not through means set forth by the historic scholarly apparatus; instead, we implement and develop individualized criteria set forth by the artists and their practices. The program will focus on the candidate’s initial need for personal self discovery and process, while naturally developing an individualistic focus for scholarly intervention. The Reinstitute thus challenges the University’s singular practice of accreditation and conformity through an active critique of historic preserve.

Self-Accredited Ph.D. at THE REINSTITUTE

The Self-Accredited Ph.D. depends on the sustained ability to self-motivate within a program that continuously adapts to the individual’s evolving thought processes. It involves an active re-evaluation of the structural and programmatic co-dependency on which institutions have historically been premised. The school measures greatness not by the concept of numbers, but rather the inherent voice of self-critique and non-conformity within one’s own practice. The Self-Accredited Ph.D program is an Advanced Degree which highlights a candidate’s independent studies, processes, and projects. We do not believe that the concept of art accreditation solely depends on the cohesiveness and conformity of cultural institutions; rather it is centered in individual thought, experimentation, invention, and the changing consciousness generated by those actions. This reflects the reality that innovation is most often spurred by opposition, methodologies of chance, and alternative views of self awareness.


PAST EVENTS | RESEARCH

CREATING ART AT A TIME OF CRISIS | THE REINSTITUTE | OPEN EXCHANGE |  A DISCUSSION WITH AARON WILLIAMS, ZOË CHARLTON, TIM DOUD    +CLOSING RECEPTION FOR THRONES AND DOMINIONS Saturday, February 25, 2017 2pm-4pm   CREATING ART AT A TIME OF CRISIS: Zoë Charlton | Tim Doud | Aaron Williams   What are the limits of Art in times of crisis? Much of the Artist’s cultural efforts have shaped the cities and cultural communities we love, yet artists even more now than ever face the greatest challenge - the realization of their efforts.   Is it not enough to just have an art practice that is interdisciplinary while striving for personal success?  As the world comes to terms with the bludgeoning reality of intolerance as current political will, many Artists face the hardship of re-examining their paths.    The talk will address the curatorial cultivation and dialog that has emerged from our current exhibition, thrones and dominions.  Some of the subjects that will be discussedare:  the effects that art has on identity politics;  self-organization as intervention;  social abstraction; institutional liberalism; history and the unmaking /remaking;  and labor and corporate institutionalism as detachment.  Please see reference articles below that will help form the parameters for  the conversation.    THE REINSTITUTE  is excited to formulate discussions around our "A Public is Self-Organized" Open Exchange model.  All are welcome and your voices are important.     ////////////////////////////////   What is the point of making beautiful things, or of cherishing the beauty of the past, when ugliness runs rampant? Those who work in the realm of the arts have been asking themselves that question in recent weeks. The election of Donald Trump, and the casual cruelty of his Presidency thus far, have precipitated a sense of crisis in that world, not least because Trump seems inclined to let the arts rot. Headlines along the lines of “What is the Role of X [music, dance, poetry, hip-hop] in the Age of Trump?” have proliferated. (Is it necessary to aggrandize the man by giving him an Age?) Competing tactics of response present themselves. Do you carry on as before, nobly defying the ruination of public discourse? Or do you seize on a new mission, abandoning the illusion of aesthetic autonomy? Many artists report feelings of paralysis. —The New Yorker http://www.newyorker.com/culture/cultural-comment/making-art-in-a-time-of-rage   ////////////////////////////////   Not since the era of witch hunts and “red baiting” has the American university faced so great a threat from government. How is the university to function when a president’s administration blurs the distinction between fact and fiction by asserting the existence of “alternative facts”? How can the university turn a blind eye to what every historian knows to be a key instrument of modern authoritarian regimes: the capacity to dress falsehood up as truth and reject the fruits of reasoned argument, evidence and rigorous verification?—The New York Times https://www.nytimes.com/2017/02/08/opinion/american-universities-must-take-a-stand.html   ////////////////////////////////   I do think that there’s something to be gained by actually forcing commercial institutions, or even major cultural institutions that are non-profits but for all intents and purposes they’re like multi-nationals (for me the Guggenheim, MoMA, they’re like multi-national corporations), I do see a value in making incursions into those spaces. Because money talks. And when your works are in those collections, you actually do change the way that art history has to be taught. When I spoke at MoMA I probably got more play in the media for that fifteen minutes than I got for two years of touring with the piece. When I’ve done work in the Whitney Biennial it’s the work that gets out to the public because of the media machines that these institutions have.—Coco Fusco https://artisticactivism.org/2013/02/coco-fusco-2/   ////////////////////////////////   The greatest discoveries in art history, as in so many fields, tend to come from those working outside the box. Interdisciplinary studies break new ground because those steadfastly lashed to a specific field or way of thinking tend to dig deeper into well-trodden earth, whereas a fresh set of eyes, coming from a different school of thought, can look at old problems in new ways.—Salon http://www.salon.com/2016/12/18/this-is-your-brain-on-art-a-neuroscientists-lessons-on-why-abstract-art-makes-our-brains-hurt-so-good/   ////////////////////////////////     Zoë Charlton was born in Tallahassee, Florida, in 1973, and lives and works in Baltimore, Maryland. Charlton received her MFA degree from the University of Texas at Austin and her BFA from Florida State University in painting and drawing. She has participated in residencies at the Skowhegan School of Painting and at The Creative Alliance in Baltimore, MD. Her work has been included in national and international group exhibitions including the Contemporary Art Museum (Houston, TX), the Studio Museum of Harlem (NYC, NY), the Zacheta National Gallery of Art (Warsaw, Poland), Haas & Fischer Gallery (Zurich, Switzerland), Clementine Gallery (NYC, NY) and Wendy Cooper Gallery (Chicago, IL). Charlton's work has been reviewed in ARTnews and Art in America. Previous experiences range from being an animator for Flat Black Films in Austin, Texas to teaching positions at Missouri State University (MO) and Southwestern University (TX). She is an Associate Professor of Art at American University in Washington, DC.      Tim Doud graduated from Columbia College with a BS in Painting and Drawing and the School of the Art Institute of Chicago with an MFA in Painting and Drawing. He attended Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture in Skowhegan, Maine. Priska C Juschka Fine Art in New York, NY and Galerie Brusberg, Berlin, Germany represent him. He has had solo shows at MC Magma in Milan, Italy, The Chicago Cultural Center in Chicago, IL and Art Basel in Basel Switzerland. He has received grants from The National Endowment for the Arts (Arts Midwest), the Marie Walsh Sharpe Art Foundations and The Pollock Krasner Art Foundation. His work has been featured in group shows at PS1 (MOMA) in New York City, The Corcoran Gallery of Art in Washington, DC, Artists Space in New York City and the Frye Art Gallery in Seattle, Washington and Art Basel, Basel, Switzerland.     Aaron Williams was born and raised in Rhode Island.  He holds an undergraduate degree from the Maine College of Art and completed his MFA graduate studies at Rutgers University.  Solo exhibitions in New York include: Max Protetch Gallery, Baumgartner Gallery and Mulherin + Pollard.  His most recent solo project was in 2013 with Lamontagne Gallery in Boston, MA.  Williams' work has been featured in several group exhibitions throughout the US, including: Portland Museum of Art, Portland, ME; Storefront Gallery, Brooklyn, NY; Garis & Hahn, NY; Memphis Social, Memphis, TN; Hal Bromm Gallery, NY; Howard House, Seattle, WA; Parallel Art Space, Queens, NY and Lu Magnus Gallery, NY.  Williams lives and works in Queens, NY.

CREATING ART AT A TIME OF CRISIS | THE REINSTITUTE | OPEN EXCHANGE | 
A DISCUSSION WITH AARON WILLIAMS, ZOË CHARLTON, TIM DOUD   

+CLOSING RECEPTION FOR THRONES AND DOMINIONS
Saturday, February 25, 2017 2pm-4pm
 

CREATING ART AT A TIME OF CRISIS:
Zoë Charlton | Tim Doud | Aaron Williams

 

What are the limits of Art in times of crisis? Much of the Artist’s cultural efforts have shaped the cities and cultural communities we love, yet artists even more now than ever face the greatest challenge - the realization of their efforts.   Is it not enough to just have an art practice that is interdisciplinary while striving for personal success?  As the world comes to terms with the bludgeoning reality of intolerance as current political will, many Artists face the hardship of re-examining their paths. 
 

The talk will address the curatorial cultivation and dialog that has emerged from our current exhibition, thrones and dominions.  Some of the subjects that will be discussedare:  the effects that art has on identity politics;  self-organization as intervention;  social abstraction; institutional liberalism; history and the unmaking /remaking;  and labor and corporate institutionalism as detachment.  Please see reference articles below that will help form the parameters for  the conversation. 

 

THE REINSTITUTE  is excited to formulate discussions around our "A Public is Self-Organized" Open Exchange model.  All are welcome and your voices are important.  

 

////////////////////////////////

 

What is the point of making beautiful things, or of cherishing the beauty of the past, when ugliness runs rampant? Those who work in the realm of the arts have been asking themselves that question in recent weeks. The election of Donald Trump, and the casual cruelty of his Presidency thus far, have precipitated a sense of crisis in that world, not least because Trump seems inclined to let the arts rot. Headlines along the lines of “What is the Role of X [music, dance, poetry, hip-hop] in the Age of Trump?” have proliferated. (Is it necessary to aggrandize the man by giving him an Age?) Competing tactics of response present themselves. Do you carry on as before, nobly defying the ruination of public discourse? Or do you seize on a new mission, abandoning the illusion of aesthetic autonomy? Many artists report feelings of paralysis. —The New Yorker

http://www.newyorker.com/culture/cultural-comment/making-art-in-a-time-of-rage

 

////////////////////////////////

 

Not since the era of witch hunts and “red baiting” has the American university faced so great a threat from government. How is the university to function when a president’s administration blurs the distinction between fact and fiction by asserting the existence of “alternative facts”? How can the university turn a blind eye to what every historian knows to be a key instrument of modern authoritarian regimes: the capacity to dress falsehood up as truth and reject the fruits of reasoned argument, evidence and rigorous verification?—The New York Times

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/02/08/opinion/american-universities-must-take-a-stand.html

 

////////////////////////////////

 

I do think that there’s something to be gained by actually forcing commercial institutions, or even major cultural institutions that are non-profits but for all intents and purposes they’re like multi-nationals (for me the Guggenheim, MoMA, they’re like multi-national corporations), I do see a value in making incursions into those spaces. Because money talks. And when your works are in those collections, you actually do change the way that art history has to be taught. When I spoke at MoMA I probably got more play in the media for that fifteen minutes than I got for two years of touring with the piece. When I’ve done work in the Whitney Biennial it’s the work that gets out to the public because of the media machines that these institutions have.—Coco Fusco

https://artisticactivism.org/2013/02/coco-fusco-2/

 

////////////////////////////////

 

The greatest discoveries in art history, as in so many fields, tend to come from those working outside the box. Interdisciplinary studies break new ground because those steadfastly lashed to a specific field or way of thinking tend to dig deeper into well-trodden earth, whereas a fresh set of eyes, coming from a different school of thought, can look at old problems in new ways.—Salon

http://www.salon.com/2016/12/18/this-is-your-brain-on-art-a-neuroscientists-lessons-on-why-abstract-art-makes-our-brains-hurt-so-good/

 

////////////////////////////////

 

 

Zoë Charlton was born in Tallahassee, Florida, in 1973, and lives and works in Baltimore, Maryland. Charlton received her MFA degree from the University of Texas at Austin and her BFA from Florida State University in painting and drawing. She has participated in residencies at the Skowhegan School of Painting and at The Creative Alliance in Baltimore, MD. Her work has been included in national and international group exhibitions including the Contemporary Art Museum (Houston, TX), the Studio Museum of Harlem (NYC, NY), the Zacheta National Gallery of Art (Warsaw, Poland), Haas & Fischer Gallery (Zurich, Switzerland), Clementine Gallery (NYC, NY) and Wendy Cooper Gallery (Chicago, IL). Charlton's work has been reviewed in ARTnews and Art in America. Previous experiences range from being an animator for Flat Black Films in Austin, Texas to teaching positions at Missouri State University (MO) and Southwestern University (TX). She is an Associate Professor of Art at American University in Washington, DC. 

 

 

Tim Doud graduated from Columbia College with a BS in Painting and Drawing and the School of the Art Institute of Chicago with an MFA in Painting and Drawing. He attended Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture in Skowhegan, Maine. Priska C Juschka Fine Art in New York, NY and Galerie Brusberg, Berlin, Germany represent him. He has had solo shows at MC Magma in Milan, Italy, The Chicago Cultural Center in Chicago, IL and Art Basel in Basel Switzerland. He has received grants from The National Endowment for the Arts (Arts Midwest), the Marie Walsh Sharpe Art Foundations and The Pollock Krasner Art Foundation. His work has been featured in group shows at PS1 (MOMA) in New York City, The Corcoran Gallery of Art in Washington, DC, Artists Space in New York City and the Frye Art Gallery in Seattle, Washington and Art Basel, Basel, Switzerland.

 

 

Aaron Williams was born and raised in Rhode Island.  He holds an undergraduate degree from the Maine College of Art and completed his MFA graduate studies at Rutgers University.  Solo exhibitions in New York include: Max Protetch Gallery, Baumgartner Gallery and Mulherin + Pollard.  His most recent solo project was in 2013 with Lamontagne Gallery in Boston, MA.  Williams' work has been featured in several group exhibitions throughout the US, including: Portland Museum of Art, Portland, ME; Storefront Gallery, Brooklyn, NY; Garis & Hahn, NY; Memphis Social, Memphis, TN; Hal Bromm Gallery, NY; Howard House, Seattle, WA; Parallel Art Space, Queens, NY and Lu Magnus Gallery, NY.  Williams lives and works in Queens, NY.

CREATING ART AT A TIME OF CRISIS | THE REINSTITUTE | OPEN EXCHANGE | 
A DISCUSSION WITH AARON WILLIAMS, ZOË CHARLTON, TIM DOUD   

+CLOSING RECEPTION FOR THRONES AND DOMINIONS
Saturday, February 25, 2017 2pm-4pm
 

CREATING ART AT A TIME OF CRISIS:
Zoë Charlton | Tim Doud | Aaron Williams

 

What are the limits of Art in times of crisis? Much of the Artist’s cultural efforts have shaped the cities and cultural communities we love, yet artists even more now than ever face the greatest challenge - the realization of their efforts.   Is it not enough to just have an art practice that is interdisciplinary while striving for personal success?  As the world comes to terms with the bludgeoning reality of intolerance as current political will, many Artists face the hardship of re-examining their paths. 
 

The talk will address the curatorial cultivation and dialog that has emerged from our current exhibition, thrones and dominions.  Some of the subjects that will be discussedare:  the effects that art has on identity politics;  self-organization as intervention;  social abstraction; institutional liberalism; history and the unmaking /remaking;  and labor and corporate institutionalism as detachment.  Please see reference articles below that will help form the parameters for  the conversation. 

 

THE REINSTITUTE  is excited to formulate discussions around our "A Public is Self-Organized" Open Exchange model.  All are welcome and your voices are important.  


Guest Spot @ THE REINSTITUTE would like to invite you to participate as our special guest in THE REINSTITUTE SALON. We will be welcoming our topic presenter Andreas Backoefer for an evening of awareness, knowledge exchange, dinner, and conversation. Andreas Backoefer will present research from his upcoming book on cultural philanthropy. As an invited Salon participant, we are excited for your contribution in our intellectual exchange in hopes to further Andreas Backoefer's ongoing research.  Please join Guest Spot for an evening of insight in the development of innovative strategies surrounding cultural philanthropy.    ////// THE REINSTITUTE — The Public is Self-Organized. 

Andreas Backoefer is a scholar and writer. He worked at a Bavarian State Museum in Germany and from 1994-1997 as dramaturg at Theater Vorpommern. In 2000 he founded the publishing company epodium (art and performance theory). He is also the founder/director of epodium gallery (since 2013). He is curating exhibitions and was responsible for the organizational structure of performance festivals and art shows in Austria. He is experienced in working with institutions (e.g. Kunstvereine, Universities) in all aspects of planning and implementing art projects. In his research work he focusses on the interplay between the institutional framework of art institutions and artistic practice. He published 2015 his book “Kunsttheorie und Museumspraxis zwischen 1987 und 2012” (Art Theorie and Art Exhibitions between 1987 and 2012). 

Andreas holds a Ph.D. in theater history.


THE REINSTITUTE | OPEN EXCHANGE | THE MODERN CANON  
VINCENT COMO:  
NO HOPE. NOT NOW, NOT EVER.
Presenters: Vincent Como
Moderators: Terence Hannum  
Saturday, December 3, 2016 2pm - 4pm


GUEST SPOT @ THE REINSTITUTE would like to invite you to the Closing Reception and Discussion for Vincent Como: No Hope. Not Now, Not Ever.  We welcome Vincent Como and moderator Terence Hannum for an engaging discussion about the trajectory of the art practice within the modern canon.  The discussion will open up a broader examination of current social/cultural movements that mirror our contemporary entrapments.  We hope to examine the idea of open subjectivity toward an art object and how the individual perspective interacts with reading and context.  

THE REINSTINSTITUTE  is excited to formulate discussions around our "A Public is Self-Organized" model.  All are welcome and your voices are important. 
   


CAROLINE WOOLARD >>> SOLIDARITY ART ECONOMIES  (RESEARCH PDF)

Bromo Tower Arts Entertainment, Inc. (Bromo) and Guest Spot @ THE REINSTITUTE are excited to host New York-based artist and organizer Caroline Woolard to discuss her work on the relationship between art and property and strategies to secure permanently affordable space.  GUEST SPOT @ THE REINSTITUTE and BROMO is inviting Woolard to lecture and provide an intensive workshop as part of its new initiative to create knowledge-sharing opportunities for artists, creative entrepreneurs, real estate professionals and community stakeholders to engage critically with issues of real estate, gentrification and space for the arts in Baltimore. The ongoing series will include lectures, workshops and panelists from Baltimore, regional and national artists and organizers working on strategies at the intersection of property, ownership and the arts.

INTENSIVE WORKSHOP

Intensive exploration of the tools, resources and challenges needed to build and execute projects in the solidarity economy. Specifics on how to establish capital, navigate real estate issues, explore commercial/studio/live work alternatives. Ideas for sharing infrastructure and navigating traditional infrastructure.

LECTURE : Solidarity Art Economies | Thursday, May 19, 2016  7-8:30pm | Maryland Art Place | 218 W. Saratoga Street | Baltimore, MD 21201


Caroline Woolard co-creates art and institutions for the “new” economy. Woolard is an artist and organizer whose interdisciplinary work facilitates social imagination at the intersection of art, urbanism, and political economy. After co-founding and co-directing resource sharing networks OurGoods.org and TradeSchool.coop from 2008-2014, Woolard is now focused on her work with BFAMFAPhD.com to raise awareness about the impact of rent, debt, and precarity on culture and on the NYC Real Estate Investment Cooperative to create and support truly affordable commercial space for cultural resilience and economic justice in New York City. Caroline Woolard’s work has been supported by residencies and fellowships at MoMA, the Queens Museum, the Judson Church, the Rockefeller Cultural Innovation Fund, Eyebeam, the MacDowell Colony, and by unemployment benefits, the curiosity of strangers, her partner, and many collaborators. Recent group exhibitions include: Crossing Brooklyn, The Brooklyn Museum, New York, NY; Maker Biennial, The Museum of Art and Design, New York, NY; and Artist as Social Agent, Cleveland Museum of Art, Cleveland, OH. Woolard’s work will be featured in Art21’s New York Close Up documentary series over the next three years. Woolard is a lecturer at the School of Visual Arts and the New School, a project manager at the worker-owned design firmCoLab.coop and is a member of the board of the Schumacher Center for a New Economics.


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DISCUSSING THE SELF-ORGANIZED — AESTHETIC POLITICS OF THE ARTIST RUN / Sunday July 19, 20152pm-4pm

Participants: Arts & Sciences Projects / New York City / Baltimore, MD ; Lauren Adams / Ortega Y Gasset Projects / Brooklyn, NY; Carl Gunhouse / Transmiter/ Brooklyn/ NY; Rod Malin / Guest Spot @ THE REINSTITUTE / Baltimore, MD;  Matthew Mahler / Small Black Door / Queens, NY;
Mel Prest / Transmitter / Brooklyn, NY; Iemke van Dijk / IS Projects / Leiden, Netherlands; Guido Winkler / IS Projects / Leiden, Netherlands


"The current economic situation and society’s low confidence in its institutions has suddenly demanded artists become more imaginative in the way they organize themselves. If labels such as ‘alternative’, ‘non-profit’ and ‘artist-run’ dominate the self organized art scene that emerged in the late 1990s, the separatist position implied by the use of these terms has been moderated during intervening years. The new anthology of accounts from the front line includes contributions by artists, as well as their institutional counterparts, that provide a fascinating account of the art world as matrix of interconnected positions where the balance of power and productivity constantly shift."   
Occasional Table - Self-Organized

 

CoHosts: Coco Fusco & Guest Spot (Speaker Series with the The Contemporary)  Monday, January 13, 2014 from 6:00 PM to 8:30 PM (EST)  Baltimore School for the Arts, 712 Cathedral Street , Baltimore, MD 21201  Monday, January 13, 2014 as we collaborate with The Contemporary to present Coco Fusco for the 2014 Speaker Series CoHosts. The event will be held at the Baltimore School for the Arts at 712 Cathedral Street, Baltimore, MD. A reception will be held before the lecture at 6pm. Seats are limited please register at ( http://www.contemporary.org/cohosts.html#fusco )  Coco Fusco is a New York-based interdisciplinary artist and writer. She has performed, lectured, exhibited, and curated around the world since 1988. She is a recipient of a 2013 Guggenheim Fellowship, a 2013 Fulbright Fellowship, a 2012 US Artists Fellowship, and a 2003 Herb Alpert Award in the Arts. Fusco’s performances and videos have been presented in two Whitney Biennials (2008 and 1993), BAM’s Next Wave Festival, the Sydney Biennale, The Johannesburg Biennial, The Kwangju Biennale, The Shanghai Biennale, InSite O5, Mercosul, Transmediale, The London International Theatre Festival, VideoBrasil, and Performa05. Her works have also been shown at the Tate Liverpool, The Museum of Modern Art, and the Museum of Contemporary Art in Barcelona. She is represented by Alexander Gray Associates in New York.  Fusco’s work combines electronic media and performance in a variety of formats, from staged multi-media performances incorporating large scale projections and closed circuit television to live performances streamed to the internet that invite audiences to chart the course of action through chat interaction. Her most recent media installation, And the Sea Will Talk to You (2012), invites audience into the physical and emotional experience of journeying from Cuba by sea. Participants relinquish their worldly possessions before entering a darkened theater where traditional seating has been replaced by the inner tubes that serve as sea crafts for Cuban rafters.  Fusco received her B.A. in Semiotics from Brown University (1982), her M.A. in Modern Thought and Literature from Stanford University (1985), and her Ph.D. in Art and Visual Culture from Middlesex University (2007). cocofusco.com

PUBLISHING IN THE DIGITAL AGE  Discussion with Waal-boght Press and photographer Carl Gunhouse  Saturday March 23, 2013 2-4pm  Guest Spot and THE REINSTITUTE are proud to present a discussion with Jason John Würm from Waal-boght Press and photographer Carl Gunhouse. The talk will explore how the current economic state of the US has changed how the independent publisher is regarded and the influence of a culture characterized by a profusion of content. Waal-boght Press is a new independent publisher of small edition photography books and zines located in Brooklyn, NY. Carl Gunhouse is a NYC-based photographer who is also known for his photography writing and his online website called Searching for the Light.  The discussion will mark the closing of Carl Gunhouse’s solo exhibition Falling Apart on Saturday March 23, 2013. 

NY CENTRALITY  THE REINSTITUTE  Panel Discussion: New York Centrality and the Artist’s Practice  Saturday May 25, 2013 2pm-4pm  1715 North Calvert St. Baltimore, MD.  In collaboration with Guest Spot’s current exhibition Same Same But Different, THE REINSTITUTE is hosting a community and panel discussion on  New York Centrality and the Artist’s Practice. The program is inspired by recent related articles that depict New York City as not a place for young artists - Vulture: Saltz on the Death of the Gallery Show; and The L Magazine: Don’t Move to New York. The discussion will spark a critical conversation about the exchange and transformation of the artist’s practice in New York and the current challenges that artists face while living in the City.  The panelists include three recent MFA graduates from Hunter College (New York City): Jay Gaskill, Fabian G. Tabibian, and Amanda Valdez; the talk will be moderated by the Director of The Reinstitute, Rod Malin.  “I’m sad that New York, the city I’ve lived in for more than 10 years, is now barely hospitable to those making the kind of art I love.” Paddy Johnson  “Art doesn’t have to be shown in New York to be validated.” Jerry Saltz